History

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The College of Home Economics (CHE) was established by the Board of Regents on July 27, 1961.

In its beginning years, CHE offered two undergraduate degree programs:  BS Food Technology (BSFT) and BS in Home Economics (BSHE), major in any of the following fields:  Nutrition and Dietetics;  Home Arts; Clothing, Textiles and Related Arts; Family Life and Child Development; Clothing, Home Furnishing and Crafts Merchandizing; and Food and Equipment Merchandising.  The graduate programs, which started with the University’s Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, where transferred to CHE’s administration:  Master of Home Economics (MHE), Master of Arts in Home Economics (MAHE) and Master of Science in Foods and Nutrition (MSFN). 

In 1992, the Educative Goals of the College were articulated.  The CHE common courses namely HE 100, 101 and 290/390 were instituted to better address CHE’s educative goals and to provide a venue for exchange of ideas among CHE students across disciplines.

Heading towards its 50th year of existence in the University in 2011, the CHE has expanded and now  administers 17 curricular programs: seven undergraduate and 10 graduate programs.

 

 

 

 

Introduction

 

The University of the Philippines (UP) Diliman College of Home Economics (CHE) was established by the Board of Regents on July 27, 1961. It emanated from the Department of Home Economics in the UP College of Education (CE) where the discipline was first officially recognized on November 12, 1921, 40 years before the College was established. Through the magnificent visioning and strong determination of Dr. Presentacion T. Perez, the founding dean of CHE, a building for the College was obtained by means of a joint grant between the Rockefeller Foundation and the University of the Philippines under the term of UP President Vicente G. Sinco. In December of 1961, the CHE emerged as a unit separate from the CE. Its main building, Alonso Hall (named after Teodora Alonso, the mother of the Philippine National Hero, Dr. Jose Rizal), and the rest of CHE’s other buildings, occupy 1.5 hectares of the total 493 hectares of the gently rolling terrain of the Diliman campus.

 

 

 

 

 

 

In its beginning years, CHE offered two undergraduate degree programs: BS Food Technology (BSFT) and BS in Home Economics (BSHE), major in any of the following fields: Nutrition and Dietetics; Home Arts, Clothing, Textiles and Related Arts; Family Life and Child Development; Clothing, Home Furnishing and Crafts Merchandising; and Food and Equipment Merchandising. The following graduate programs, which started with the University’s Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, were transferred to CHE’s administration: Master of Home Economics (MHE), Master of Arts in Home Economics (MAHE) and Master of Foods and Nutrition (MSFN).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now on its 50th year, the CHE takes pride in administering seventeen curricular programsseven bachelor degree programs: Bachelor of Science in Home Economics (BSHE); Bachelor of Science in Family Life and Child Development (BSFLCD); Bachelor of Science in Community Nutrition (BSCN); Bachelor of Science in Food Technology (BSFT); Bachelor of Science in Clothing Technology (BSCT); Bachelor of Science in Interior Design (BSID) and Bachelor of Science in Hotel, Restaurant and Institution Management (BSHRIM); and ten graduate programs: Diploma in Early Child Development (DECD); Master of Home Economics (MHE); Master of Interior Design (MID); Master of Family Life and Child Development (MFLCD); Master of Science in Nutrition (MSN); Master of Science in Food Science (MSFS); Master of Food Service Administration (MFSA); Doctor of Philosophy in Home Economics (PhDHE); Doctor of Philosophy in Nutrition (PhDN) and Doctor of Philosophy in Food Science (PhDFS). With only 166 undergraduate and 24 graduate students in AY 1961-1962, the student population has increased to 1,204 among whom were 1,064 undergraduate students and 140 graduate students in AY 2010-2011, currently making CHE the 6th largest in terms of student population among the 26 degree granting units in UP Diliman.

Throughout the five decades of CHE’s existence in the UP Diliman campus and under the administration of eleven deans (Presentacion T. Perez, Eva Beatriz Gonzalez, Aurora G. Corpuz, Estrella T. Alabastro, Cecilia A. Florencio, Lydia B. Arribas, Angelita M. Dizon, Flor Crisanta F. Galvez, Demetria C. Bongga, Milagros P. Querubin and Adelaida V. Mayo), CHE’s curricular programs have been directed to fulfill its mission which is to enhance the quality of day-to-day living of families and consumers and to prepare them to face changes. The CHE views this mission from both a specific focus and the larger societal and ecological perspectives. The dailiness of life involves both science, technology and art. It is concerned with issues and challenges facing families which require understanding of societal developments, both local and global.

In time for the celebration of CHE’s golden year, the CHE faculty approved the expanded version of the 1990 definition of Home Economics during its General Faculty Assembly on 7 April 2011:

 Guzman, Matilde de la Paz. 1982. Home Economics Programs: A Historical Perspective. University of the Philippines

College of Home Economics.

 Enrollment Data of the Office of the College Secretary, AY 2010-2011.

 Enrollment Data of the Office of the University Registrar AY 2011-2012.

 Florencio, Cecilia A. 1995. The College of Home Economics at the University of the Philippines: What it was, what it wants to be and the process of becoming. Monograph Series No. 2. Quezon City: UP College of Home Economics.

 

Home Economics is the study of families and the management of resources available to them for the satisfaction of basic needs in changing environments. It seeks to understand the multi-dimensionality of daily living in the context of home, workplace and community by drawing from a range of disciplines (science, arts and humanities) and integrating its specialized areas within a home economics core.

 

 

Birth of a Promising College:

 

 

 

 

THE FIRST DECADE of the UP Diliman College of Home Economics (CHE) was spearheaded by Dr. Presentacion T. Perez.

 

 

 

 

 

There were initially four departments namely, Department of Foods and Nutrition, Department of Family Life and Child Development, Department of Clothing, Textiles and Related Arts and Department of Home Economics Education.

The College Journal. The publication of The Home Economist, which Dean Perez initiated as soon as the college was founded in 1961, became part of the regular function of the faculty. Its cover used an illustration of the sculptural wall installation by Ansel Day-Ag, depicting a Filipino family that decorated the Alonso Hall lobby.

The Euthenics Program. The Euthenics Program of the UP Bureau of Public Schools-CLEP Program from 1963 -1979 was offered jointly by the CHE with the UP College of Education and the UP Women’s Club. Courses entitled “Orientation in the role of women in modern society” were offered in four semesters to first and second year students enrolled in what was then College of Arts and Sciences.

 

Creation of Pioneer College Facilities

The Child Development Center. In 1964, Dean Perez retired and passed on to Dr. Eva B. Gonzalez the stewardship of the CHE. Dean Gonzalez gave emphasis on the importance of CHE’s advocacy in enriching knowledge about Filipino children and youth. Having started as a nursery school in 1957, a two-storey Child Development Center (CDC) building was finished in January 1964 to allow more children to be admitted to the preschool. It had ample room for observation, play, art work and for offices of the teaching staff. The role of CDC in the making of “understanding and enlightened parents and the happy, confident child” was highlighted during this period.

 

 

The Home Management House (HMH) housed CHE’s nursery school before it was transferred to the CDC in the College of Home Economics complex. It was in the HMH that a course in home management was conducted. The course stressed the efficient use of time, energy, space and equipment. It was also concerned with the application of home management principles in a residence house which provides actual experience in family living. In 1969, the HMH was moved to Purok Aguinaldo where the modern and well-furnished homes formerly occupied by visiting professors in the School of Economics of the University were located.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Pilot Food Plant, which started operating before Dean Perez retired, continued its functions of serving as the laboratory of the food technology students. It is a processing unit for those who may be interested to try out their idea of engaging in food processing industry and to render canning services for those who brought home-cooked products.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The College Tearoom became truly a teaching laboratory when Julita Umali, instructor in food service, chaired the working committee of this unit. During the period of 1964-1970, menus were changed, improvements in the kitchen were made and an in-service training program for employees was instituted.

The Filipino Costume Museum was established by Dr. Leonarda Jurado, then CTRA Chair. It served as a resource center and research laboratory for the study of textiles, costume design and accessories.

 

 

 

Institution of New Academic Programs. By 1970, two new academic programs, the Bachelor of Science in Hotel and Restaurant Administration (BSHRA) and Bachelor of Interior Design (BID) were instituted in CHE. Studies were also made on the Bachelor of Science in Home Economics, major in Nutrition and Dietetics, resulting to a revision of the program to Bachelor of Science in Community Nutrition.

 

 

 

 

A Speck of Shadow. The last year of Dean Gonzalez’s administration was 1970, a very troubled year for the country when student activism in the campus caused disruptions of classes. The year was remembered not only for the student unrest and boycott of classes but also for the damage to the main building, Alonso Hall, by typhoon Yoling.

 

 

Period of Recovery and Expansion

 

THE SECOND DECADE of the UP College of Home Economics (CHE) covering the years 1971 to 1981 marked the tenth year of the CHE on July 27, 1971 and the 50th year of the discipline of home economics in the University of the Philippines on November 12, 1971. Dr. Aurora G. Corpuz was appointed Dean of CHE in December 1970. The outstanding features of this decade are as follows:

 

 

 

  • There were seven undergraduate programs, four masteral and two doctoral programs;

  • The CHE academic facilities were widely expanded since Dean Corpuz started her term in 1971.

  • Researches by individual faculty members as well as cooperative research projects have been given much impetus because of the financial support of the National Science Development Board, National Research Council of the Philippines and Philippine Atomic Energy Commission.

  • Faculty development took the form of graduate studies for M.A. or PhD attendance of local and overseas fellowship in different areas of study.

  • Granting of professorial chair awards to the faculty with the commission to write textbooks.

  • Publication of the Journal of Home Economics for research reports of the faculty and students to replace The Home Economist. Publication of a tabloid, Home Economics Quarterly, which later was renamed Buklod to report the activities of the faculty, students and non-academic staff.

  • The formation of the College of Home Economics Foundation (CHEF).

  • The creation of two offices, Office of Research and Publications and Office of Community and Extension Service

 

 

 

 

The administration of Dean Corpuz was recognized for the building expansion of CHE to meet the demands of the College’s new programs. The prelude of this was the repair of Alonso Hall damaged by typhoon Yoling. The roof of Alonso Hall affecting the offices of the Dean and the College Secretary as well as the college library was blown off. Student Records Section) was too small for the CHE students’ needs.

 

 

 

In 1974, the Multi-Purpose Hall was built adjacent to the library on the west side of Alonso Hall. This became the venue for lectures, exhibits and different programs of different faculty and student groups.

The prompt repair of the damaged areas of Alonso Hall caused a minor disrupt of classes and the administrative function of the college. Early in the ‘70s, plans were already set for an annex to house the new college library, a costume museum, student lounge, a multi-purpose room with a seating capacity of 150, the research laboratory, nutrition laboratory, storerooms and faculty offices. In 1972, two units of pre-fabricated Marcos-type buildings were set-up for the college library.

The Home Management House (HMH) in the ‘60s was converted into the Crafts and Interior Design Laboratory (CIDL) after the HMH was transferred to Purok Aguinaldo. The college degree programs in the ‘70s were administered by the following departments: Food Science and Nutrition; Clothing, Textiles & Related Arts; Family Life and Child Development and Home Economics Education. The Department of Food Science and Nutrition (FSN) administered three undergraduate programs – BS in Community Nutrition (BSCN), BS in Food Technology (BSFT) and BS in Hotel, Restaurant Administration (BSHRA). The latter was jointly administered with the College of Business Administration. In addition to the three undergraduate programs, the Food Science and Nutrition Department also administered graduate programs. The former MS in Food Technology was renamed MS in Food Science. A PhD in Food Science was approved by the University Council in 1975. The Department of Clothing, Textiles & Related Arts (CTRA) administered three undergraduate programs namely, BSHE major in Clothing, Textiles and Related Arts; BSHE, major in clothing, home furnishing and crafts merchandising and BSHE, major in interior design.

 

 

 

The CHE Catalogue of 1975-76 dropped the BSHE course major in Clothing, Textiles and Related Arts and BSHE major in clothing, home furnishing and crafts merchandising. The program for the major in interior design was changed to Bachelor of Interior Design (BID) and was administered jointly with the UP College of Architecture. The Bachelor of Science in Clothing Technology (BSCT) was approved by the University Council on September 3, 1975.

 

 

 

Following the trend in the other departments of the College, the Department of Family Life and Child Development (FLCD) also changed the designation of its degree programs from the BSHE in FLCD, to Bachelor of Science in FLCD. The Department of Home Economics Education (HEEd) had three programs, namely, BSHE major in Home Arts; Master of Home Economics and Master of Arts in Home Economics with two options- clothing, textiles & related arts and family life and child development. The HEEd Department also administered the Social Orientation program which was required of all women students for general education. In 1977, the Infant Development Program (IDP), the first in the country then, was created by the FLCD Department for the Child Development Center.

 

 

Toward a Period of Renewal

THE THIRD DECADE of the UP College of Home Economics (CHE) may be considered as one of the most prolific periods in CHE’s 30 years of existence as an academic unit in the areas of research and extension. It straddled the administration of three deans:

 

 

Dr. Aurora G. Corpuz whose term culminated in 1984, Dr. Estrellita F. Alabastro who served from 1984 to 1990 and Dr. Cecilia A. Florencio, whose term capped the end of this decade in 1991. During this period, the College went through several challenges and triumphs as it endeavored to assert its significance as an institution in the University. The decade was characterized by the following:

 

Asserting Disciplinal Identities

This decade started with the successful defense of the College for the retention of its Bachelor of Science in Hotel and Restaurant Administration (BSHRA) program in 1981. The same year also saw the recognition of Interior Design as an important discipline with Bachelor of Interior Design (BID) graduates qualifying for the Interior Design Licensure Examination under the Specialty Board of Architecture.

 

 

 

 

Likewise, the Family Life and Child Development (FLCD) Department added a vertical class (mixture of children ages 3, 4, and 5 years old) in its Child Development Center to serve more age groups. In 1982, HRA faculty members team-taught with the faculty of the College of Business Administration in preparation for their eventual autonomy in handling management courses for the BSHRA program.

 

 

 

Fittingly, the BSHRA program made its mark as a discipline from 1984-1988, when its number of enrollees reached its peak. Its students also started to prove their mettle by joining inter-school competitions and brought home their first trophy in table setting competition.

 

 

The Bachelor of Science in Home Economics (BSHE) program major in Home Arts was renamed to Bachelor of Science in Home Economics (BSHE) in 1984 with new courses geared towards a heightened teaching and research competence of its graduates. In 1986, the Bachelor of Science in Clothing Technology (BSCT) program underwent curricular revision with additional courses on management, marketing, foreign language and free electives.

 

 

 

 

 

Forging Academic Excellence

 

 

In 1982, the College also proved its academic leadership by pioneering three graduate programs in the Philippines: Master of Food Service Administration (MFSA), Master of Family Life and Child Development (MFLCD) and Doctor of Philosophy in Home Economics (PhDHE). Academic excellence also flourished in 1991 with faculty members providing 72 researches, 13 books, 40 journal publications and 5 professorial lectures. To complete its primordial function as an academic unit, CHE found significance by offering 63 extension projects mostly for the underserved, particularly geared towards the uplift of the Filipino family.

 

 

 

 

 

The Department of Food Science and Nutrition (FSN) also established international linkages with prestigious agencies such as Infectious Disease Association of California (IDAC); United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), International Labor Organization (ILO), Department of Trade and Industry (DTI), Department of Health (DOH), Department of Education (DECS) and National Science and Technology Authority (NSTA). Its continued academic pursuits were also defined by its Nutrition graduates’ leadership in board exams.

 

 

 

Soaring New Heights

The third decade commenced and culminated with improvements of CHE’s facilities. In 1984, the construction of Marcos pre-fab structures paved the way for the expansion of the College. In 1991, more improvements were done which included the FLCD’s Child Development Center lobby and resource center and FSN’s Food Technology Laboratories. The CHE has come full circle when it implemented a new operational system in 1990, supported by forms, flow charts and standard office procedures, thereby lending a more professional and efficient administration. The creation of a conduit between the staff and the Dean, the Administrative Personnel Executive Committee facilitated coordination among its constituents. In general, the third decade saw the CHE’s metamorphosis into a “college of substance”.

 

Rebirth of the College

 

Toward the Building of a Self-Respecting and Respected Institution

 

THE FOURTH DECADE of the UP Diliman College of Home Economics (CHE) was steered by four deans namely Dr. Cecilia A. Florencio (1990-1996), Prof. Lydia B. Arribas (1996-1998), Dr. Angelita Dizon (1998-2000) and Dr. Flor Crisanta F. Galvez (2000-2002). The first half of this decade may be described as a PERIOD OF REBIRTH. CHE was directed toward the building of a self-respecting and respected institution1 after it had survived the challenges posed by attempts of outside forces to “cannibalize” its academic programs2 during the previous decade. Under the strong leadership of Dr. Cecilia A. Florencio as the fifth Dean of CHE, the College was able to fight claims as well as threats of other units that CHE’s academic programs were rightfully theirs. A series of programs directing the College to address the need for self-study and self-renewal were conducted during the term of Dean Florencio (1990-1996). These facilitated the creation of a stronger CHE anchored on its mission in enhancing the quality of life of Filipino families and preparing them to face changes.

 

Defining and Transmitting CHE’s Educative Goals

 

 

In 1990, “Home Economics” was defined for the first time by the CHE faculty in their own terms under the headship of Dean Florencio. In 1992, the educative goals and responsibilities of CHE were identified and given delineation by the CHE faculty through Dean Florencio’s guidance. Academic programs of CHE sought to mold studentry towards academic excellence based on sound human values, imbuing them with a deep sense of social responsibility and challenging them to help strengthen the foundation of the nation and transform the country into a better place to live in.

 

 

 

Thus, CHE’s SEVEN EDUCATIVE GOALS were identified and unanimously approved by the CHE faculty on April 22, 1992: Love of God, Love of Country, Integrative Role of the Family, Management –Mindedness, Social Responsibility, Ethical Behavior and Pursuit of Excellence. Two common undergraduate courses - HE 100: Family and Societal Development and HE 101: Ethics and Values - were instituted in 1992 to better address these formulated educative goals of CHE. These 2 new courses were required of all students enrolled in the CHE. In 1995, two graduate level common courses (HE290/390) were also instituted. These graduate common seminar courses provide a venue for students to develop and refine their skills in research and to widen their perspective and appreciation of the complementarities of the sub-disciplines. These courses were required of all graduate students in the CHE. On that same year, a Diploma in Early Childhood Development (DECD) was instituted. The Diploma is intended for practicing or would-be preschool teachers or administrators with minimal or no formal training in early childhood education.

 

Shaping a Self-Respecting and Respected Institution

During Dean Florencio’s term, more than 1,700 CHE students participated in 80 extension activities of the College from 1990-1993. These activities targeted the disadvantaged families, entrepreneurs, homemakers, professionals, government and non-government employees. In 1992, the CHE received the UP Diliman Chancellor’s Award for its outstanding community outreach program. In 1995, the CHE-Libis Pahinungod Program was launched with curricular, research and extension components. CHE “adopted” Pook Libis in Barangay UP Campus, Diliman, Quezon City to focus its service-learning activities. The Disciplinal Identity Development Program (DIDP) was conducted by the College in 1994 to have a better understanding of each of the seven sub-disciplines of Home Economics and to tract the future of CHE’s seven undergraduate programs . Home economics and its sub-disciplines were defined by the CHE faculty in 1995. All seven sub-disciplines embody critical aspects in family and day-to-day living. These sub-disciplines are viewed as complementary to one another, interactive and having the components of the home economics discipline. The CHE Family Studies Program (FSP) or Pamilya sa Lipunan was also launched in 1994 as a research and training unit. FSP’s overall goal was to enhance the understanding of Filipino families and promote their well-being and development. The Koleksiyon ng Katutubong Gamit sa Pagkain was launched during the 31st College Foundation Day in 1992. It is a collection of traditional and indigenous kitchen and household equipment that promotes Filipino cultural heritage. Gusali 2 was constructed in 1993. It is a two-storey building which includes a multi-purpose hall on the second floor that has a seating capacity of 350 and can be converted into 3 separate classrooms. In 1993, Student activity centers were constructed across the Alonso Hall building for CHE students to use for their organization or class activities. The Clothing Textile Laboratory (CDL) was built beside the Crafts and Interior Design Laboratory (CIDL). The Office of Student Relations, responsible for planning and administration of student welfare programs and the supervision and coordination of students’ extracurricular activities was created in 1994. In 1995, Dr. Cecilia A. Florencio was appointed as University Professor Emeritus, the highest faculty rank in the University.

 

Forging a Cultural and Environmental Awareness in CHE

In 1996, Prof. Lydia B. Arribas was appointed the sixth CHE Dean (1996-1998). Dean Arribas’ advocacy on promoting the development of the local arts and crafts proved helpful during the centennial celebration of the Philippine independence in 1998 when she was requested to replicate the Philippine Flag that was originally made by Marcela Agoncillo in Hong Kong. The Department of Hotel, Restaurant and Institution Management (DHRIM) was created in 1998. During that same year, Dr. Angelita M. Dizon became the seventh CHE Dean (1998-2000). The staff cooperative enterprise became one of Dean Dizon’s initiatives that grew from her vision of providing the staff with venues to channel their efforts towards productive endeavors. Likewise, a Waste Segregation Project was initiated in the College where receptacles were put in place and labelled. Compost pit was installed at the back area of the IDS area. The Department of Clothing, Textiles and Related Arts was renamed Department of Clothing, Textiles and Interior Design to recognize the professional identity of the discipline of interior design in the College. In 2000, Dr. Flor Crisanta F. Galvez was appointed as the eighth CHE Dean (2000-2002). Dean Galvez ushered the College in the commencement of its Fifth Decade.

 

Dean Aurora Garcia Corpuz – December 7, 1970- August 31, 1984.

  • BSE (Major in Home Economics ; Minor in English and Health Education) – UP 1949

  • MHE (Major in Child Development) University of Massachusetts (USA) – 1956

  • Doctor of Education (Major in Educational Administration ; minor in Social Work) UP 1969

  • Faculty – College of Education and College of Home Economics

  • Appointed Professor Emeritus in 1988

  • Membership to various professional organizations both here and abroad

  • Received numerous awards and citations

Dean Estrella Fagella Alabastro – September 1, 1984- April 30, 1990

Graduated from UP College of Engineering with a degree in Chemical engineering in 1961. She pursued and finished her masteral and doctoral studies in engineering at Rice University in America in 1965 and 1967 respectively. She passed the Board Exam for Chemical engineers in July 1961.

Dr. Alabastro held several positions in the university and national government. She was Dean of the College of Home Economics from 1984-1990. She held various positions both in the private and public sector. She was a cabinet Secretary of the Department of Science and Technology. She has also received numerous awards and citations. She has several publications under her name.

During her term as Dean, the BSHRA program made its mark as a discipline from 1984-1988, when its number of enrollees reached its peak. Its students also started to prove their mettle by joining inter-school competitions and brought home their first trophy in table setting competition.

The Bachelor of Science in Home Economics (BSHE) program major in Home Arts was renamed to Bachelor of Science in Home Economics (BSHE) in 1984 with new courses geared towards a heightened teaching and research competence of its graduates. In 1986, the Bachelor of Science in Clothing Technology (BSCT) program underwent curricular revision with additional courses on management, marketing, foreign language and free electives.

The third decade commenced and culminated with improvements of CHE’s facilities. In 1984, the construction of Marcos pre-fab structures paved the way for the expansion of the College. The CHE has come full circle when it implemented a new operational system in 1990, supported by forms, flow charts and standard office procedures, thereby lending a more professional and efficient administration. The creation of a conduit between the staff and the Dean, the Administrative Personnel Executive Committee facilitated coordination among its constituents. In general, the third decade saw the CHE’s metamorphosis into a “college of substance”.

 

Dean Cecilia A. Florencio –May 1, 1990- April 30, 1996.

  • BSHE major in Foods and Nutrition – UP 1961

  • MS Nutrition – University of Iowa – 1964

  • PhD Nutrition – Michigan State University 1967

  • Appointed University Professor in June 22, 1995

  • Conferred Scientist III

  • Gawad Chancellor awardee in teaching, research and administrator

  • Faculty – UP College of Home Economics and Michigan State University

  • Received various awards and citations from professional organizations both local and international

  • Member of various professional organizations

  • Prolific writer with numerous published monographs, journal articles and speeches

  • Under the strong leadership of Dr. Cecilia A. Florencio as the fifth Dean of CHE, the College was able to fight claims as well as threats of other units that CHE’s academic programs were rightfully theirs. A series of programs directing the College to address the need for self-study and self-renewal were conducted during her term. These facilitated the creation of a stronger CHE anchored on its mission in enhancing the quality of life of Filipino families and preparing them to face changes.

 

Dean Lydia Boquiren Arribas July 25, 1996 – June 30, 1998

  • BSHE College of Education UP, 1955

  • MA (Home Economics) College of Home Economics UP 1977

  • Diploma in Costume Designing, Fashion Sketching, Pattern Drafting, Cutting and Fitting National School of Dress Design, Chicago Illinois, 1953

  • Received the Local Fellowship Award 1971-1972 and other awards granted by professional association.

  • Membership to professional organizations and social and civic organizations

  • Served UP in various capacities starting from Student Assistant, instructor to Professor . Also held various administrative positions

  • Has several published and unpublished works under her name

 

Dean Angelita Mendoza Dizon – July 1, 1998 – March29, 2000

Dean Flor Crisanta F. Galvez – March 30, 2000 – April 30, 2003

Dean Demetria C. Bongga – May 1, 2003 – April 30, 2006

Dean Milagros P. Querubin – May 1, 2006 – April 30, 2009

Dean Adelaida V. Mayo – June 1, 2009 – June 30, 2012

Dean Maria Lourdes David Catral July 27, 2012 – May 31, 2013